Keynote Speaker — Tom Sanville

Tom SanvilleIn April 2010 Tom Sanville joined LYRASIS as the new Director of Licensing and Strategic Partnerships. On behalf of the library membership he oversees all vendor licensing, programs, and strategic partnerships, including the management of the electronic resources portfolio and supervision of the implementation of database licensing.

Previously he had been Executive Director of OhioLINK since July 1992. This program now serves 89 member and participating institutions with a union catalog equipped with a statewide patron-initiated borrowing system, over 100 reference and research databases, and cooperative statewide electronic centers for theses and dissertations, journals, books, and digital media.

He is the 2007 recipient of the Professional Achievement Award for the Association for Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies, a division of the American Library Association. The award is presented for professional achievement within the areas of networking and statewide service and programs. He is active in the development of the International Coalition of Library Consortia (ICOLC), Libraries Connect Ohio, and other library organizations.

Tom was formerly Vice President of Marketing for Online Computer Library Center (OCLC), Inc., Dublin, Ohio, where he worked for ten years. Prior to OCLC, he spent seven years in the soft drink industry including marketing positions with The Coca-Cola Company. He has a BS from the Georgia Institute of Technology and an MBA from the University of Michigan.

Collaboration – and what it really means to come of age

Abstract

Library consortia are so ingrained into the fabric of library operations that none of us can imagine a world without them. But are we using consortia to their full advantage? “Coming of age” does not simply mean reaching a plateau of effectiveness or benchmarking efficiency. Maturity gives us the vision to see how consortium-based activity must be exploited to its fullest extent to leverage our limited economic resources into relevant information services. Transformations are still needed to extend our content-buying power, but it goes beyond that. What are the rapidly developing discovery tools and technologies needed to bring cohesive access to our underused database silos? What tools are necessary to deliver materials across the rapidly changing array of devices? Discover how collaborative action can expand our collective ability to be the future’s most relevant information providers!